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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
chief and i and others in the technology world in the city likewise our officers to save time and allowing them to use smart phones that are connected no to the system that our attorney general has. we also invested in the community ambassador program to get them trained. those are residents of people that live in the tenderloin south of market in the bay view or vigilance valley they're walking the streets they can be the additional eyes and areas working with our police department having phones that are freely provide bit at&t and he greeting passengers on the muni stops we've had some trouble with. you looked at the data and they've improved drastically so thank you to the ambassadors program. overall our cities crime data is showing we're in the right direction homicides are down over 35 percent and shootings down between 15 and 20 percent. we want to continue that direction as we get towards year-end the police chief and i are making sure this continues. and the shoppers mayor we're going to make sure that everyone has a safe experience. we're going to be an attractive ci
, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engin
on technology and really save in community because community is what yelp is all about. yelps success is living proof that american business doesn't want just service a small community but this whole community. from the beginning this torrid company acknowledged that this can be a good model of bits. and certainly there's no befrt place to test this model but in san francisco. consider where we are today 140 new montgomery street stand for innovation. the first sky skrarpt to be in san francisco. it was then the pacific telephone company. i've been using caving stone as means of communication but that was the innovation of the day. that was here in 1929 that, sir winston churchill made a telephone call for his 21st wedding anniversary he said why say the age of migraines it past it's just the beginning to today, we mark a new beginning it's called the monument for talk it's called yelp. today, we have the opportunity to celebrate the now global company community community community how many communities jeremy. while millions of companies understand how yelp can help to change minds fewer know h
services administrations is to deliver the best technology services to the government and american people. critical parts are providing with that,s that preserve the integrity off our historic fats and incorporating the design features all have been integrated. those of us who work here about work in a historically more than building. the m public works will homicide a place in his. at the history it dates back to 17952 when it was commissions to design is a new this. this federal building is within the center complex. after the earthquake of 18906 devastated many buildings it was transformed offering a promise of a now a fundamental humane city. this was designed by before a began in 1933 and was complete in 1936. the 77 his is unique including the historic oral office of chester. thanks it to the recovery act it's a beacon to achieve a plaque. in other words, this historic building has received a new life and it proudly takes it's police radios with the jackson's r. browning an, an effort to revitalize san francisco market street corridor. this historic renovation goes well beyond the i
cameras were two big and the technology the digital technology was hopeless and impossible but in the last few years bits become possible and he puts 9 cameras on the side of his car he didn't want them on on top of each other. this is to emphasize this is 9 different prospective. this is 9 point prospective staved a one point prospective and he's going down the road you obviously can't see it i can't show you a video reproduction. he does the same route over and over again. it's a remarkable thing almost disturbing to me. i hold with german ray in her when says that representation or reality this is his idea of digital technology it's leelt is not the thing that can be not be represented. he can't magician something as vivid as realities. and it's one of the things i want to explore owe november 23rd when we have folks from silicon valley. it looks good but i has images of 18 screens going along the side of the road and they've never looked so vivid. where the doors of prospective cleans we'll see the world. there's a vitality in those images that surpass not only what other citizen ma do
call the stem economic scientists and technology and engineering and math; right? and the country has really go forward for a long time the fact we've got a to start in our high schools having a fairly substantial number of kids on a track brown where ware doing computer science to get the skills to go into the firms and no non-manufacturing companies and get good jobs. we decided we, you know, would send a sister-in-law that somehow the united states would generate the idea and produce all in china. in response other parts of the midwest large managing or merchandising companies and northeast ohio you saw philosophical in business and other global dynamics they're seeking substantially job growth are to the benefit of not just the kids of ph.d. from stanford or mit but a whole bunch of folks coming out of high schools and colleges with technical prosecutors. >> tests map silicon valley it's great with ideas they didn't get made in china but it's great if you're an engineer or not so great if you're a generate but mayor lee how this model stacks up in terms of the collaboration. >> t
and cultural and a design and, of course, technology. but all of those companies that we're celebrated really make our city buzz and we're become a gravitational center. the calendar is completely filled and shows how innovation is in our city. sf music tech conference will be part of this month and the 4rb9 empowerment most will all happen and many other particular events will happen in the month of october. you can see those exciting event at the i of time of m innovative sf.com. i'm happy to kick this off. posted the next exciting event here putting our whole cities municipal code into get hub (clapping) >> you know what that means? that's credible. when i talk about bureau categorize nobody knows whether it effects our streets our parks or vehicle code the way we build offices this year so many laws public safety and others that it compacts so to post this on the get hub and to allow get hub to be our way in which people what navigate to break it down to make t it usedable by other coders it's kind of like sailing we have had to learn with taking was and to have that on the screen in fro
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
of the technology companies in town to create a smallest community as we call it so the fiber comes not only to the down the road it's tied in by copper bylaw but goes to the home so people if they which i say to work and live in their home they'll have the speed in their home to do the kind of work we expect people in san francisco to do. >> bruce i want to get your response and your - you write something about cars and driver's license and i want to get to that. >> but i want to build on what the mayor said. climate is important it's also an economic comparatively active. we've mapped the jobs it's 2.7 million jobs it's varied >> today or the future. >> yes. today. thank you more innovation fuel and export during which than the economy as a whole. this is the van ignore of the industrial reluctance we want to be at the head of it. we talk about portland. portland actually doubled exports in - >> in san francisco we don't think of that (laughter). >> i'm sure how san francisco would respond to that we're weirder but portland is betting on a because they were so smart at the metropol
in the future here about technology and where to bring us in society? >> i often get asked if i'm an op to op to optimist or pessimist and i think i'm both. i am an optimist because i feel like we can take those steps, but one of our best weapons for keeping the internet free is the internet. it helps us organize ourselves and take collective action in ways that previous generations could only dream of. when i was an activist in the 80's 90 percent of my time was stuffing envelopes. this is an amazing thing and i am incredibly optimistic that computers will lower the cost of working together and as that cost getses lower, our ability as a loosely constituted public to hold these establishments to account will get more and more powerful. people sometimes ask me, like, how would you write science fiction about the future? how do you predict things about the future. in general, if you want to predict futuristic things that feel credible, i think what you should do is imagine that anything that today requires a big group like a corporation or government or army and imagine it being done by a gr
. >> it used to be deaf con kids, which is hands down the best kids technology program i've ever seen. 20,000 hackers descend on vegas to bump every lock ever made and how air traffic control systems are inherently insecure and so on. and often, a side room all the kids who come with their parents get to hang out and have all of the keynote speakers from the head of the nsa to notorious and awesome hackers come and give them one of 20 workshops on how this stuff works and how to think critically about it. they get lock picking workshops, they learn how to hack devices. your daughter discovered a venerability in apple's ios operating system when she was 9 and disclosed that to apple after a long internal debate about whether or not the kid should use it secret and use it to improve their scores on network video games. what an amazing ing program. you bring them to those programs. not in year, interestingly enough. you uninvited the dod this year. >> only one year because the year before i think that balance and having both sides is really what we all need. we can't be afraid of the other s
and to be include in the economic opportunities here. so i'm working with anyone else technology companies but companies that decided to move into mid-market even without the innovative of a tax exemption and 3 of the company's said we're coming because of the talent here in the city. i know they're to be matched with the talent of the people in g s a. we've wanted to work outside of our bureaucracies. this is the new government we're producing here locally and we want to match that we have great partner like our libraries and museums and we're going to compliment that. we can only do that to embrace the opportunity not only to make mistakes but better sufficiency and involve more people and housing and economic opportunity. this is what market street isal about it's our main corridor in san francisco. and that's why for so many years even before the companies technology came to be there were those artists from a.c.t., from the theatres, from the costume shop and their great arts foundation burning man they were trying to get some life 90 in the story front and with that risk-taking came s
to a lot of entrepreneurs. i came to the united states to pursue a masters in technology. i love my experience being part of the education system and getting a masters and learning from people who were innovating things themselves and teaching students how to do. being able to be there and being able to be a part of this is incredible. i moved to the valley area to an internship here. my very first job was a start up. trying to take an idea it was so inspiring. being able to experience that desired me to start my own business. i came over on the student visa and working for different employers i was tied to the employer who was definitely very limiting. the process take a long time. but finally, i was able to get a gastrocard and start my own business. that's important and being able to be a part of this in this debate on immigration reform is critical. personally immigration reform t is important for me. i care a lot about finances. and think about your personal finances oh, you spend money on the gas and electricity but you also make investments and you invest in the stock marke
main corridor in san francisco. and that's why for so many years even before the companies technology came to be there were those artists from a.c.t., from the theatres, from the costume shop and their great arts foundation burning man they were trying to get some life 90 in the story front and with that risk-taking came some attraction but it's symbolic with the public-private partnership we help them and they us. my job and i know nancy pelosi has done it i'm following here lead to sustain that success to open up those opportunities. this building will compliment what we're doing and it's going to be sustained. we've got neighborhood investments and ambassadors that are hired from people who live in the district to compliments the workforce. it's now, one of the great streets market street. so i congratulate the g s a you're the new caretakers but those will be our folks to recreate all the pathway for those to visit and to recognize that san francisco proudly is an international city one that is proud to take every stimulus opportunity and to establish and a sustain it and grow it
the middle schools to give them the technology and wifi on campus or tablet for the kids or training for the teachers or engagement for the parents. this year our city is historically viflt in public schools to the tune of $50 million on top of what the state provides for them. we have an additional $25 million in universal pre k programs to help our public school kids survive and props in mid-school through high school. because of additional resources i'm working with the business community. you know, this year i asked that we create 6 thousand summer jobs for our kids who all live in san francisco from all walks of life. guess what, we accomplished this summer 6 thousand 8 hundred jobs for our kids. that's a millstone. a millstone (clapping.) and tonight we get to honor and celebrate some people who are doing extraordinarily things not only on behalf of the american neighborhood communities but you're going to find some great personalities and characteristic and commitment like vernon cloud who is doing health care or orlando who is from the nah how nation working on housing. on a
improve these systems, you need to deploy the latest technology. woman: the pipe bursting process is designed to replace an old pipe without digging an entire trench. the old pipe has cracks and displaced joints and openings in it. we try to stop, not only infiltration, but exfiltration, where sewage would actually leak out of the pipe. the head is larger, so it breaks away the old pipe and allows the new pipe to come in behind it. griffin: we are saving about 67% of the cost of actually digging old pipe up. clyne: it's less invasive than an open-cut process, where you would open the whole trench up and replace the pipe. it's called "trenchless" technology, so... that's as good as it gets. griffin: we don't have to dig up everyone's yard, and we refurbish that pipe at a much-reduced cost. another technique, the cured-in-place lining. it's equivalent to putting a large sock through the existing sewer. we form a new pipe inside the old pipe, and therefore we seal up all of the defects that allow rainwater to come in. hunter: we repair about 730 leaks a month in our system. griffin:
. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spe
encourage any marker of any cell phone to enable the bringing technology because if it's not worth stealing it makes the city >> good afternoon ladies and gentlemen. i'm the director of the fine arts in san francisco. with you hope you're as happy and inspired as we are staff of the museums by this magic recognition. we're happy to show 3 hundred and 98 works a plethora of media that works from oil to water to signify in his videos i've had large plantings. n this as large of love working with gregory the occur art of the exhibition. as you know the exhibition fills all of the perhaps exhibition groundless on this romance as well as 3 rooms on the first year. you'll see a great wall of 2 thousand indefinite hockney into the dispensation to post expression. this research was secretary knowledge rover the masters and it's shown publicly here for the first time. now this afternoon. i'm delighted tow introduce to you lawrence wiks letter and a great authority on mr. wexler to the stage thank you (clapping) thank you, everyone. so let me see if i can get this right (laughter) (clapping) menu e
. so what can the city's do not only the tech world is leading the world but in the technology industries they're not as progressive as in the tech community part what are your thoughts in the tech community leading the way to be more progressive on immigration and the city of san francisco leading the way for other cities of embracing immigrants. people not knowing we pay the same taxes and have the same obliterations as the rest of the americans. so what can the city and a tech destroy do. that's why the silicon leadership group who have all those members to make sure that all clusters emphasize the need for all immigration. we want to get to one more person >> i'm here actually, i went through the exact same issue i was a foreign student and it took me looked at to get the green card. i'm not sure in the category i see less than 20 thousand people in america - the question i have why people say the farm worker when you look at the - they have the h1 b visa which means allowing both people can go to singapore and go to the u.s. to work and they never have a problem and they
social services has been the use now of technology and i see it sort of akin to and i read an article recently. what you are trying to do now is obviously face risk decisions now on much more empirically based situation. now the pretrial diversion project and pretrial release is really the hummer so to speak. the district attorney and sheriff set the policy. we have been working or this base practice for years. obviously the major stake holders, the district attorneys, the she rifs. just to give you an idea of the scope of what we are doing. approximately 1100 people come out of jail from our program. this time we are targeting somewhere around 1500 cases. prior to the last 3 or 4 years, the data that is now coming in, recidivism is around 6 or 7 percent, failure to appear rate or people to appear in court is lower. they are walking people out of jail. we've just come out of a difficult 4-5 years and that is budget years with a lot of social services being cut and really at the end of the day when you are talking about it and talking about housing and talking about employment, you a
've about that here before there are disrush active technologies in the past where it will dmich employment so i don't want to by any stretch want to talk about rofbdz for certain kinds of work but if we focus as the mayor and a connie has focused about a very different kind of committee that's productive and innovative that's resilient; right? and we begin to talk about some of those issues like the shift to 0 lower carbon economy as giving cities and metz the first advantage i don't think we should be overly worried or concerned about this technical innovation and we went off course for a very long time by this is our wake up call this is the moment we need to understand what assets and advantages we have in the world and we need to max maximum misses their opportunity. if we can stay on that focus i think we can make up the jobs deficit about 10 million jobs in the country we can have quality jobs that can help a large portion of our youth make their way. let's embrace this technology for the world >> we have to he said it there bruce cats vice president of the metropolitan institution
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)